Category Archives: Lean

Key Tweets from @MarkGraban – Week of August 24, 2015

Key TweetsHere’s the latest installment of “Key Tweets,” a post that summarizes some of my tweets (or retweets) from the week. Follow me @MarkGraban and join the fun and the conversation. See the previous installments of Key Tweets here.

If you’re reading this via email or RSS, you might get a better experience by clicking through to view it on the website because it will display article link previews, embedded photos, etc., providing a better reader experience for you.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

What’s Demoralizing? The Colors on a Chart or Not Improving the System?

I forget what hospital these charts are even from, but it doesn’t really matter. It’s become more common, in my gemba visits, to see hospital departments charting metrics. They are often part of “huddle boards” that teams gather around on a daily basis (or, ideally, each shift).

It’s good to see daily metrics, as opposed to monthly averages, since it’s better to have something closer to “real time” data — if you react and respond appropriately.

It’s also good to see simple, handwritten charts… that’s often part of what makes daily cycles possible as opposed to waiting for computer reports and fancy charts being printed out by somebody.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Can You Even Consider Kaizen When the Chart Showing Time and Workload Looks Like this?

In th KaiNexus webinar that I did with Dr. Greg Jacobson earlier this week (“Making Time for For Continuous Improvement” – view the recording), I shared a graph that shows what could or should be time for continuous improvement in a workplace.

Screen Shot 2015-08-19 at 8.40.16 AM

The red line shows the amount of time available – this could be hours in a shift, hours in a day, time in a week, or time available in the year. This amount of time is generally fixed, although we can sometimes adjust the working time in a day. A manufacturing company can go from two 8-hour shifts to three. A hospital, however, usually has the limit of 24 hours in a day (although some clinics or departments could increase the open hours or all departments could add staff to increase the number of work hours available).

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Key Tweets from @MarkGraban – Week of August 10, 2015, Baseball, #LeanStartup Sushi

Key TweetsHere’s the latest installment of “Key Tweets,” a post that summarizes some of my tweets (or retweets) from the week. Follow me @MarkGraban and join the fun and the conversation. See the previous installments of Key Tweets here.

If you’re reading this via email or RSS, you might get a better experience by clicking through to view it on the website because it will display article link previews, embedded photos, etc., providing a better reader experience for you.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Using Lean to Organize Hospital Closets… NPR Commenters Are Not Impressed

I saw this story when it originally appeared online as part of a local public radio station in California. It was now picked up nationally by NPR and a number of you emailed me about this Lean healthcare piece about UCLA Medical Center:

Hospitals Turn To Toyota To Make Care Safer And Swifter

It’s a generally positive story about a large hospital system working to improve… and turning to Toyota (directly to Toyota) for help. To be fair, they did far more than organize closets… but that was the story that started the piece.

From the story:

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail