Category Archives: Thoughts

Hey Leaders: When is an Idea a Good Idea?

Leaders frequently face the challenge of trying to determine weather a new idea is a good one or not. And these ideas can originate either from their own minds or […]

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LeadershipNow 140: June 2015 Compilation

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twitter Here are a selection of tweets from June 2015 that you might have missed:

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What happens when things go wrong?

Service resilience is too often overlooked. Most organizations don’t even have a name for it, don’t measure it, don’t plan for it.

I totally understand our focus on putting on a perfect show, on delighting people, on shipping an experience that’s wonderful.

But how do you and your organization respond/react when something doesn’t go right?

Because that’s when everyone is paying attention.

More Reasons Women Need to Negotiate Their Salaries

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How do companies end up with significant gender pay inequalities, if they don’t intend to discriminate against women? Here’s a simple economic model to show how this can happen:

Let’s assume your organization has two types of equally qualified and valuable potential hires – one has a low aversion to negotiating (let’s call them Type M), while the other (Type W) has a considerably higher aversion. Both will overcome this aversion if the gap between what they are worth (say $ 100,000) and what they’re offered is large enough. For Type M, let’s assume that the tipping point is $ 10,000. So Type Ms are likely to accept an offer of $ 90,000 without trying to negotiate. In contrast, the tipping point is $ 30,000 for Type W, which means they will accept a $ 70,000 salary without negotiating. If either type negotiates, they get what they are worth: $ 100,000.

Given these assumptions, the optimal strategy for the organization is to take advantage of the candidates’ aversion to negotiate, with potential savings of $ 10,000 for M types and $ 30,000 for W types. As a result, Type M candidates are offered higher starting salary ($ 95,000) than the Type W candidates ($ 80,000). This saves the company, on average, $ 5,000 per Type M hired and $ 20,000 per Type W hired, which results in Type Ms being paid $ 15,000 more than the Type Ws.

How Leadership Styles Dictate Potential Success

We have all worked for someone at some point in our career who felt more like a slave master than a leader, right? You know that person I am referring […]

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